Earliest American Cultures

There are several sites in Northwest Georgia that can help your students to deepen their learning of Georgia’s earliest American cultures. Choose from the following sites, or combine each of the trips for an extended day program.

The Booth Western Art Museum

At this Smithsonian Affiliate Museum, students will learn through an interactive exploration of American Indian art and artifacts. Your students will explore a map to determine the movement pattern of American Indians over the course of time and will compare and contrast the various environmental strengths and challenges. Through economic principles of trade and voluntary exchange, students will learn how American Indians continue to contribute to American culture and life.


New Echota and The Etowah Indian Mounds

A 54-acre archaeological site inhabited as early as 1000 A.D. by the ancestors of Etowah Indians. Your students will gain a better understanding of the history of the Etowah Indians, as Park Rangers take them through a walking tour of the Etowah Indian Mounds. Discover the daily lives, including the traditions and hardships faced by this proud people, during your visit.


Funk Heritage Museum

On the campus of Reinhardt University, the Funk Heritage Museum is an excellent venue for students studying North Georgia and early American history. This docent-led tour will teach how American Indians used the environment to obtain food, clothing, and shelter.